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History

The first written mention of the village, whose name is interpreted somewhat indefinitely as the “village of the people of Vata” and could indicate an older origin (13th and 14th century), is recorded in the land records to the summer of 1540, when Bretislav Svihovsky of Ryzmberk sold part of the Dlouhá Ves farm to the powerful burghers of Pavel, Jan and Václav Tomka from Čejkov. It can be assumed that the village probably shared its older, unrecorded fates with the farm of Dlouhá ves and in the second half of the 15th century it was annexed to the vast dominion of Švihovský family of Rýzmberk, which just before the mid-16th century started to lose their property thanks to their indebtedness. The intrinsic character of the Vatětice housebuilding on the way from Hartmanice and Palvínov to the valley of the Elephant Stream and further to Velký Radkov and Radešov gives a rather elemental impression, which would suggest a natural growth rather than a planned establishment. Assuming the village was founded in the pre-Hussite era, the more regular ground plan could be partially deformed by secondary desolation at the end of the Middle Ages. However, the original plan of the village was affected by feudal owners. Tomka of Čejkov, who remained the owner of the Dlouhá Ves farm and therefore the nobility of Vatětice until the beginning of the 17th century, was replaced by Čejka’s family of Olbramovice, of which in 1634 Petr Čejka of Olbramovice separated villages Vatětice and Velký Radkov and sold them to Sidonie Ludmila Čejková. When it was sold ten years later, there was already a castle with a court yard. The establishment of the mansion took place at the expense of three farmsteads, as aptly pointed by the gneiss: “from the three uphill grunts, whose names and what they belonged to, can not be known many years ago under the previous manor all cases to the court manor should be oriented.” In 1713, the area of ​​the dominant soil of the Vatětice farm was estimated at 87 sowing fields, meadows at 32 hay cars and four rows of forests. The merchandise also included a mill with one composition (Elefant-Mühl) and a mill with a saw (Haasen-Mühle). Rustic was, according to the gneiss gully, only a tavern, which was reported 21 strychs of arable land with a note that it is currently in use of nobility. So it remained according to the Theresian cadastre from 1713, it was only 7, 5 sowing strychs of rustic land, owned by a shepherd and cupbearer. The seizure of the villages in Vatětice by the nobility confirms for 1721 the owners’ of the Vatican goods obligation to pay tithing to the priests’ parish and the own rustic area at the end of the 1930s, which occupied only 47% of agricultural land throughout the farm and even Vatětice itself was significantly smaller. Vatětice natives recalled that in the first half of the 20th century, virtually all land in the land registry was managed by a large farm and large farmsteads were in Velký Radkov. According to Sommer’s topography, the Vatětice farm even operated two court yards for some time – in addition to Vatětice also in Velký Radkov (at the end of the 18th century it was emphyteutized). Along with this, there were other lord operations: a brewery, a pub, a sheepfold, a glass factory near Wunderbach and a paper mill had been working here before the mid-18th century, since 1853 a distillery was in operation. Until its decline, the farm, which had three yards at the beginning of the 20th century (Palvínov, Vatětice, Štěpanice) and whose administration had been based in Palvínov since the mid-19th century, has prospered greatly. Certainly thanks to the cooperation of the owners with the agrarian expert Elegio Freudl from Děčín.

History

The first written mention of the village, whose name is interpreted somewhat indefinitely as the “village of the people of Vata” and could indicate an older origin (13th and 14th century), is recorded in the land records to the summer of 1540, when Bretislav Svihovsky of Ryzmberk sold part of the Dlouhá Ves farm to the powerful burghers of Pavel, Jan and Václav Tomka from Čejkov. It can be assumed that the village probably shared its older, unrecorded fates with the farm of Dlouhá ves and in the second half of the 15th century it was annexed to the vast dominion of Švihovský family of Rýzmberk, which just before the mid-16th century started to lose their property thanks to their indebtedness. The intrinsic character of the Vatětice housebuilding on the way from Hartmanice and Palvínov to the valley of the Elephant Stream and further to Velký Radkov and Radešov gives a rather elemental impression, which would suggest a natural growth rather than a planned establishment. Assuming the village was founded in the pre-Hussite era, the more regular ground plan could be partially deformed by secondary desolation at the end of the Middle Ages. However, the original plan of the village was affected by feudal owners. Tomka of Čejkov, who remained the owner of the Dlouhá Ves farm and therefore the nobility of Vatětice until the beginning of the 17th century, was replaced by Čejka’s family of Olbramovice, of which in 1634 Petr Čejka of Olbramovice separated villages Vatětice and Velký Radkov and sold them to Sidonie Ludmila Čejková. When it was sold ten years later, there was already a castle with a court yard. The establishment of the mansion took place at the expense of three farmsteads, as aptly pointed by the gneiss: “from the three uphill grunts, whose names and what they belonged to, can not be known many years ago under the previous manor all cases to the court manor should be oriented.” In 1713, the area of ​​the dominant soil of the Vatětice farm was estimated at 87 sowing fields, meadows at 32 hay cars and four rows of forests. The merchandise also included a mill with one composition (Elefant-Mühl) and a mill with a saw (Haasen-Mühle). Rustic was, according to the gneiss gully, only a tavern, which was reported 21 strychs of arable land with a note that it is currently in use of nobility. So it remained according to the Theresian cadastre from 1713, it was only 7, 5 sowing strychs of rustic land, owned by a shepherd and cupbearer. The seizure of the villages in Vatětice by the nobility confirms for 1721 the owners’ of the Vatican goods obligation to pay tithing to the priests’ parish and the own rustic area at the end of the 1930s, which occupied only 47% of agricultural land throughout the farm and even Vatětice itself was significantly smaller. Vatětice natives recalled that in the first half of the 20th century, virtually all land in the land registry was managed by a large farm and large farmsteads were in Velký Radkov. According to Sommer’s topography, the Vatětice farm even operated two court yards for some time – in addition to Vatětice also in Velký Radkov (at the end of the 18th century it was emphyteutized). Along with this, there were other lord operations: a brewery, a pub, a sheepfold, a glass factory near Wunderbach and a paper mill had been working here before the mid-18th century, since 1853 a distillery was in operation. Until its decline, the farm, which had three yards at the beginning of the 20th century (Palvínov, Vatětice, Štěpanice) and whose administration had been based in Palvínov since the mid-19th century, has prospered greatly. Certainly thanks to the cooperation of the owners with the agrarian expert Elegio Freudl from Děčín.

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